Come and Sketch At the Beach!

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

One Persimmon, Two Persimmon, Three!

Persimmons on watercolor paper
Watercolor and Ink 
Not too long ago, I found some gorgeous persimmons at the grocery and I decided they would make wonderful sketching models. And they did!

They didn't move a bit. They held their poses and didn't seem to mind at all when I became distracted or had to go and hunt for tools.

Rather than sketch in my sketchbook, I decided to test out some new watercolor paper.

All three were identical when I finished up, but since I was testing the paper, I decided to go one step further and add ink. When the paint was dry, I added black ink.
Black ink was added after the painting was complete
The white highlights are the paper showing through. 
Many folks like to draw in ink and then add watercolor. To me, this feels a lot like paint by numbers or a coloring book page. I sometimes feel restrained by the lines. By adding ink after the painting is completed, I can:

  • determine whether or not the art would benefit from adding ink;
  • avoid feeling like my creativity is restrained;
  • add ink for emphasis to either draw attention to one area or away from another;
  • create an entirely different look and feel to the work;
  • use ink as sparingly or heavy as necessary to create the look I want.
Persimmons San Ink
Taking a look at the images, tell me which you prefer and why if you know. Do you like the ink best or without better?

There's no right or wrong, just personal preferences.

26 comments:

  1. Interesting thoughts on using the ink. I seem to go to my ink to 'save' my work, as you will notice in this weeks ITTPVaca. assignment. lol. Can one eat Persimmons? Reminds me of going to the dentist and they give you the Novocaine. ;-) Very nice. I think I like the one without the ink because you do such beautiful work. What paper did you decide on?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, persimmons are edible. This is a paper called Fluid. I can't say I'm crazy about it, but then I haven't done much work on it either. Thanks for your thoughts on ink, Clare!

      Delete
  2. I prefer those without ink, Laure. They seem to have more body, the colors look more lively, the subtle shades of the watercolor seem to be more obvious. Like Clare, I usually go to ink to add more definition to a sketch. Your persimmons don't need that at all

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Monique. It is interesting to hear how you use ink or think about using ink.

      Delete
  3. I would ink the leaves but leave the rest uninked. I am not sure why, but the lower part of the fruit just seems more dimensional and real without the ink.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Tyanne. I didn't think about just inking the leaves. I'm not sure if I would like that or not. I may have to ink one of the remaining persimmons to see.

      Delete
  4. As I still think I'm a beginner in watercolour sketches, maybe my opinion is not important to you, but I definitely prefer the picture with out. the ink Like one of the comments ,I feel the ink adds interest around the leaves but not around the edge,

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for commenting, Barbara, and yes, your opinion is very important to me. It is often those who are just beginning their journey who see things those of us who have been on the track for a while cannot. It seems quite a few folks are in agreement about just inking the leaves. I may have to give it a whirl.

      Delete
  5. I love your persimmons. Ink or no ink? both have their merits-

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Janet! They were fun to paint.

      Delete
  6. When you have good lights and darks ink isn't really needed. I do like it both ways each having instances where that style shines. I go for more ink myself simply because I sometimes have trouble seeing my pencil lines. In this case I like it best without ink because you did create a lovely piece without the ink so why add it?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Timaree! I am usually of the same mind. I seldom add ink unless the work doesn't speak the way I think it can or should.

      Delete
  7. Love your persimmons, not sure they have them over here. I am a fiend for adding ink, it's like an addiction. I like your idea to wait until the end as there have been regrets over things that just didn't look right.
    Lynne

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lynne, I seem to have a love 'em and leave 'em affair with ink. I'll go for stretches where that's all I work with and then I walk away and forget ink ever existed. I think other folks would call that boredom!

      Delete
  8. I like the ones without ink. I do like to draw in ink tho. I don't feel constrained. It is just a different look.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Agreed, Lisa, it's definitely a different look. I think it's just me that gets balled up with feeling constrained.

      Delete
  9. I like both and perhaps it depends more on the subject. I think both though are lovely and I really can't say which I prefer. I too work in ink and watercolor a great deal. Often when I do I have to consider whether the ink can stand alone or does a touch of color warmed it. Always get such great food for thought when I visit you - thanks.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Debbie. I sometimes struggle to add ink to flowers and other delicate subjects, but have no trouble with houses or rocks and such.

      Delete
  10. I like the addition of the ink on the leaves because it adds even more definition there, but not the outline of the persimmon itself.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Hi Laure ... I like the persimmons without the ink. I feel the ink around the fruit restricts the composition and detracts from the beauty of the fruit. Some very fine broken lines around the leaves to better describe them would enhance the painting. The colors are wonderful and alive! PS You said you were testing the paper. What kind and how did you rate it?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Carole. I was playing around with a paper called Fluid. They make sketchbooks and what not and also have a full sheet available. I can't say I love it, but nor have I worked on it enough (yet) to say I don't like it. I'll post more as I play with it.

      Delete
  12. Beautiful work Laure... Your persimmons appear to be rising out of your paper. The colors are so vibrant and your transitions are so defined that you create the lines in watercolor that others use ink to accentuate. I enjoy viewing your work with examples of each, since both ways are equally pleasing to the viewer.

    When using watercolors, my personal preference is to ink after the composition is dry. I think that is due to the fact that I only ink small areas that need a little extra emphasis. A lot of the time, I allow my lines to fade away and come back. Hopefully by doing the inking in that order, I can avoid the feeling that the piece is looking more like an animation cell... at least to me anyways. Ink is one of those mediums that can run the artist into trouble if overused. A little bit goes a long way for me. :)

    I was just rummaging through my watercolors this morning while organizing my studio. You have inspired me to play around with them a little this afternoon!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Brenda! Nice to see you out in cyberspace. I could not agree with you more about ink being tricky to use and yes, a little sometimes goes way toooo far! Good luck with your playing.

      Delete
  13. Visiting your blog of the first time and love it. I work with various media too mostly graphite, ink, and color pencil but now I am inspired to break out my watercolors again. Your persimmons are beautiful. I like the addition of the ink and agree it is better to lay down the paint first. Thanks for sharing your painting techniques.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, CJ_Apple! Thanks for visiting! I've found that I don't have the patience to work in graphite, ink and color pencil anymore. I'm too anxious to get to the next thing I want to sketch.

      Delete

I would love to connect with you! Please leave a comment so we can talk...